Archive for June, 2013

XenServer 6.2 is now Open Source!

Tuesday, June 25th, 2013

It is an amazing news to me. I really love XenServer. I think that Citrix were able to make a good use of Linux mechanisms for the purposes of virtualization, without abusing the OS layer (like some of the other virtualization solutions did). The file locations are decent (for example – most parts are located in /opt, which is the right place for it to be at), and in general, it always felt to me as if Citrix developers (and the original XenSource developers) had respect for the OS. I liked it, and still do.

The product was not perfect. There were ups and downs, there were times when I cursed it, and times when I was full of joy by its behavior – which can happen from time to time, if you really like and care about a software product.

So, today Citrix announced that XenServer 6.2, the shiny new release, will become fully open-sourced. That the entire feature-set of XenServer previous versions can be yours for free. However, for support and some minor administrative tasks, you will want to purchase the licensed version. As far as I understood, these are the differences. Almost nothing more. Wow. Kudos!

Grab it while it’s hot here!

Juniper NetworkConnect (NC) and 64bit Linux

Tuesday, June 25th, 2013

Due to a major disk crash, I have had to use my ‘other’ computer for VPN connections. It meant that I have had to prepare it for the operation. I attempted to login to aJuniper-based SSL-VPN connection, however, I did get a message saying that my 64bit Java was inadequate. I had a link, as part of the error message to Juniper KB, to which I must link (remembering how I have had to search for possible solutions in the past).

The nice thing about this solution is that it does not replace your default Java version on the system, which was always a problem, as I was using Java for various purposes, but it recognizes that it’s part of the (update-)alternatives list, and makes use of the correct Java version.

Juniper did it right this time!

Oh – and the link to their KB

And to Oracle Java versions, to make life slightly easier for you. You will need Oracle login, however (you can register for free).

TSClient on Ubuntu 12.04

Tuesday, June 25th, 2013

Today there will be a few different posts. This is a day full of events, so…

My first – to allow tsclient to work under Ubuntu 12.04, you should follow this guide: http://superuser.com/a/547102

To sum it up:

  1. Get tsclient to your architecture from http://pkgs.org
  2. Install it using ‘sudo dpkg –force-depends -i tsclient_0.150-3ubuntu1_amd64.deb’
  3. Edit /var/lib/dpkg/status , search for tsclient, and remove the entry containing libpanel-applet2-0

Done.

Cacti NetApp Ontap API data query

Sunday, June 23rd, 2013

I have been using the excellent template and scripts from this forum post, however, when the NetApp device is loaded with LUNs and volumes, the script will cause the Cacti to timeout, and during that time, consume CPU. The original cause of this problem was a workaround to some NetApp Perl API bug the original author found, which forced him to query the entire data set for each sub-query. This is nice for five, or even ten volumes, but when you’re around 400 volumes, things just look bad.

Due to that, I have taken upon myself to make this script more scalable, but forcing a single data query from the NetApp for each data type (volume, LUN, system, etc) and data query type (get, index, etc). A unique file was created with its name being the storage_device_name.data_type.query_type. Following queries to any subset of this data were just accessing this file, and not the remote NetApp device, killing network, CPU, and tending to time out on operation and leave huge blank parts in the graphs.

I will post my modified template in the forum as well, but I place it here, just so that it will be both available for me, and for any interested reader.

Get it here:NetApp_OnTap-SDK_cacti-20130623.tar.gz

 

Target-based persistent device naming

Saturday, June 22nd, 2013

When Connecting Linux to a large array of SAS disks (JBOD), udev creates default persistent names in /dev/disk/by-* . These names are based on LUN ID (all disks take lun0 by default), and by path, which includes, for a pure SAS bus – the PWWN of the disks. It means that an example to such naming would be like this (slightly trimmed for ease of view):

/dev/disk/by-id:
scsi-35000c50055924207 -> ../../sde
scsi-35000c50055c5138b -> ../../sdd
scsi-35000c50055c562eb -> ../../sda
scsi-35000c500562ffd73 -> ../../sdc
scsi-35001173100134654 -> ../../sdn
scsi-3500117310013465c -> ../../sdk
scsi-35001173100134688 -> ../../sdj
scsi-35001173100134718 -> ../../sdo
scsi-3500117310013490c -> ../../sdg
scsi-35001173100134914 -> ../../sdh
scsi-35001173100134a58 -> ../../sdp
scsi-3500117310013671c -> ../../sdm
scsi-35001173100136740 -> ../../sdl
scsi-350011731001367ac -> ../../sdi
scsi-350011731001cdd58 -> ../../sdf
wwn-0x5000c50055924207 -> ../../sde
wwn-0x5000c50055c5138b -> ../../sdd
wwn-0x5000c50055c562eb -> ../../sda
wwn-0x5000c500562ffd73 -> ../../sdc
wwn-0x5001173100134654 -> ../../sdn
wwn-0x500117310013465c -> ../../sdk
wwn-0x5001173100134688 -> ../../sdj
wwn-0x5001173100134718 -> ../../sdo
wwn-0x500117310013490c -> ../../sdg
wwn-0x5001173100134914 -> ../../sdh
wwn-0x5001173100134a58 -> ../../sdp
wwn-0x500117310013671c -> ../../sdm
wwn-0x5001173100136740 -> ../../sdl
wwn-0x50011731001367ac -> ../../sdi
wwn-0x50011731001cdd58 -> ../../sdf

/dev/disk/by-path:
pci-0000:03:00.0-sas-0x5000c50055924206-lun-0 -> ../../sde
pci-0000:03:00.0-sas-0x5000c50055c5138a-lun-0 -> ../../sdd
pci-0000:03:00.0-sas-0x5000c50055c562ea-lun-0 -> ../../sda
pci-0000:03:00.0-sas-0x5000c500562ffd72-lun-0 -> ../../sdc
pci-0000:03:00.0-sas-0x5001173100134656-lun-0 -> ../../sdn
pci-0000:03:00.0-sas-0x500117310013465e-lun-0 -> ../../sdk
pci-0000:03:00.0-sas-0x500117310013468a-lun-0 -> ../../sdj
pci-0000:03:00.0-sas-0x500117310013471a-lun-0 -> ../../sdo
pci-0000:03:00.0-sas-0x500117310013490e-lun-0 -> ../../sdg
pci-0000:03:00.0-sas-0x5001173100134916-lun-0 -> ../../sdh
pci-0000:03:00.0-sas-0x5001173100134a5a-lun-0 -> ../../sdp
pci-0000:03:00.0-sas-0x500117310013671e-lun-0 -> ../../sdm
pci-0000:03:00.0-sas-0x5001173100136742-lun-0 -> ../../sdl
pci-0000:03:00.0-sas-0x50011731001367ae-lun-0 -> ../../sdi
pci-0000:03:00.0-sas-0x50011731001cdd5a-lun-0 -> ../../sdf

Real port (connection) persistence is not possible in that manner. A map of PWWN-to-Slot is required, and handling the system in case of a disk failure by non-expert is nearly impossible. A solution for that is to create matching udev rules which will allow handling disks per-port.

While there are (absolutely) better ways of doing it, time constrains require that I get it to work quick&dirty. The solution is based on lsscsi command, as the backend engine of the system, so make sure it exists on the system. I tend to believe that the system will not be able to scale out to hundreds of disks in its current design, but for my 16 disks (and probably for several tenths as well) – it works fine.

Add 60-persistent-disk-ports.rules to /etc/udev/rules.d/ (and omit the .txt suffix)

 

# By Ez-Aton, based partially on the built-in udev block device rule
# forward scsi device event to corresponding block device
ACTION=="change", SUBSYSTEM=="scsi", ENV{DEVTYPE}=="scsi_device", TEST=="block", ATTR{block/*/uevent}="change"

ACTION!="add|change", GOTO="persistent_storage_end"
SUBSYSTEM!="block", GOTO="persistent_storage_end"

# skip rules for inappropriate block devices
KERNEL=="fd*|mtd*|nbd*|gnbd*|btibm*|dm-*|md*", GOTO="persistent_storage_end"

# never access non-cdrom removable ide devices, the drivers are causing event loops on open()
KERNEL=="hd*[!0-9]", ATTR{removable}=="1", SUBSYSTEMS=="ide", ATTRS{media}=="disk|floppy", GOTO="persistent_storage_end"
KERNEL=="hd*[0-9]", ATTRS{removable}=="1", GOTO="persistent_storage_end"

# ignore partitions that span the entire disk
TEST=="whole_disk", GOTO="persistent_storage_end"

# for partitions import parent information
ENV{DEVTYPE}=="partition", IMPORT{parent}="ID_*"

# Deal only with SAS disks
KERNEL=="sd*[!0-9]|sr*", ENV{ID_SERIAL}!="?*", IMPORT{program}="/usr/local/sbin/detect_disk.sh $tempnode", ENV{ID_BUS}="scsi"
KERNEL=="sd*|sr*|cciss*", ENV{DEVTYPE}=="disk", ENV{TGT_PATH}=="?*", SYMLINK+="disk/by-target/disk-$env{TGT_PATH}"
#KERNEL=="sd*|cciss*", ENV{DEVTYPE}=="partition", ENV{ID_SERIAL}!="?*", IMPORT{program}="/usr/local/sbin/detect_disk.sh $tempnode"
KERNEL=="sd*|cciss*", ENV{DEVTYPE}=="partition", ENV{ID_SERIAL}=="?*", IMPORT{program}="/usr/local/sbin/detect_disk.sh $tempnode", SYMLINK+="disk/by-target/disk-$env{TGT_PATH}p%n"

ENV{DEVTYPE}=="disk", KERNEL!="xvd*|sd*|sr*", ATTR{removable}=="1", GOTO="persistent_storage_end"
LABEL="persistent_storage_end"

 
You will need to add (and make executable) the script detect_disk.sh in /usr/local/sbin. Again – remove the .txt suffix
 

#!/bin/bash
# Written by Ez-Aton to assist with disk-to-port mapping
# $1 - disk device name
name=$1
name=${name##*/}
# Full disk
TGT_PATH=`/usr/bin/lsscsi | grep -w /dev/$name | awk '{print $1}' | tr -d ] | tr -d [`
if [ -z "$TGT_PATH" ]
then
	# This is a partition, so our grep fails
	name=`echo $name | tr -d [0-9]`
	TGT_PATH=`/usr/bin/lsscsi | grep -w /dev/$name | awk '{print $1}' | tr -d ] | tr -d [`
fi
echo "TGT_PATH=$TGT_PATH"

 
The result of this addition to udev would be a directory called /dev/disk/by-target containing links as follow:

/dev/disk/by-target:
disk-0:0:0:0 -> ../../sda
disk-0:0:1:0 -> ../../sdb
disk-0:0:10:0 -> ../../sdk
disk-0:0:11:0 -> ../../sdl
disk-0:0:12:0 -> ../../sdm
disk-0:0:13:0 -> ../../sdn
disk-0:0:14:0 -> ../../sdo
disk-0:0:15:0 -> ../../sdp
disk-0:0:2:0 -> ../../sdc
disk-0:0:3:0 -> ../../sdd
disk-0:0:4:0 -> ../../sde
disk-0:0:5:0 -> ../../sdf
disk-0:0:6:0 -> ../../sdg
disk-0:0:7:0 -> ../../sdh
disk-0:0:8:0 -> ../../sdi
disk-0:0:9:0 -> ../../sdj

The result is a persistent naming, based on real device ports.
 
I hope it helps. If you get to read it and have some suggestions (or a better use of udev, which I know is far from perfect in this case), I would love to hear about it.