Archive for September, 2013

Attach multiple Oracle ASM snapshots to the same host

Thursday, September 12th, 2013

The goal – connecting multiple Oracle ASM snapshots (same source LUNs, of course) to the same machine. The next process will demonstrate how to do it.

Problem: ASM disks use a disk label called ASMLib to maintain access even when the logical disk path might change (like adding a LUN with a lower ID and rebooting the server). This solves a major problem which was experienced with RAW devices, when order changed, and the ‘wrong’ disks took the place of others. ASM labels are a vital part in managing ASM disks and ASM DiskGroups. Also – the ASM DiskGroup name should be unique. You cannot have multiple DiskGroups with the same name.

Limitations – you cannot connect the snapshot LUNs to the same server which has access to the source LUNs.

Process:

  1. Take a snapshot of the source LUN. If the ASM DiskGroup spans across several LUNs, you must create a consistency group (each storage device has its own lingo for the task).
  2. Map the snapshots to the target server (EMC – prepare EMC Snapshot Mount Points (SMP) in advance. Other storage devices – depending)
  3. Perform partprobe on all target servers.
  4. Run ‘service oracleasm scandisks‘ to scan for the new ASM disk labels. We will need to change them now, so that the additional snapshot will not use duplicate ASM labels.
  5. For each of the new ASM disks, run ‘service oracleasm force-renamedisk SRC_NAME TGT_NAME‘. You will want to rename the source name (SRC_NAME) to a unique target name, with some correlation to the snapshot name/purpose. This is the reasonable way of making some sense of a possibly very messy setup.
  6. As the Oracle user, with the correct PATH variables ($ORACLE_HOME should point to the CRS_HOME) and the right ORACLE_SID (for example – +ASM1), run: ‘renamedg phase=both dgname=SRC_DG_NAME newdgname=NEW_DG_NAME verbose=true‘. The value ‘SRC_DG_NAME’ represents the original (on the source) DiskGroup name, and the NEW_DG_NAME represents the new name. Much like when renaming the disks – the name should have some relationship with either the snapshot name, so you can find your hands and legs in this mess (again – imagine having six snapshots, each of a DiskGroup with four LUNs. Now – this is a mess).
  7. You can now mount the DiskGroup (named NEW_DG_NAME in my example) on both nodes

Assumptions:

  1. Oracle GI is up and running all through this process
  2. I tested it with Oracle 11.2.0.3. Other versions of 11.2.0.x might work, I have no clue about previous 11.1.x versions, or any earlier versions.
  3. It was tested on Linux. My primary work platform. It was, to be exact, on RHEL 6.4, but it should work just the same on any RHEL-like platform. I believe it will work on other Linux platforms. I have no clue about running it on any other Unix/Windows platform.
  4. The DiskGroup should not be mounted (no reason for it to be mounted right on discovery). Do not manually mount it prior to performing this procedure.

Good luck, and post a comment if you find this explanation either unclear, or if you encounter any problem.

 

 

 

XenServer – increase LVM over iSCSI LUN size – online

Wednesday, September 4th, 2013

The following procedure was tested by me, and was found to be working. The version of the XenServer I am using in this particular case is 6.1, however, I belive that this method is generic enough so that it could work for every version of XS, assuming you're using iSCSI and LVM (aka - not NetApp, CSLG, NFS and the likes). It might act as a general guideline for fiber channel communication, but this was not tested by me, and thus - I have no idea how it will work. It should work with some modifications when using Multipath, however, regarding multipath, you can find in this particular blog some notes on increasing multipath disks. Check the comments too - they might offer some better and simplified way of doing it.

So - let's begin.

First - increase the size of the LUN through the storage. For NetApp, it involves something like:

lun resize /vol/XenServer/luns/SR1.lun +1t

You should always make sure your storage volume, aggregate, raid group, pool or whatever is capable of holding the data, or - if using thin provisioning - that a well tested monitoring system is available to alert you when running low on storage disk space.

Now, we should identify the LUN. From now on - every action should be performed on all XS pool nodes, one after the other.

cat /proc/partitions

We should keep the output of this command somewhere. We will use it later on to identify the expanded LUN.

Now - let's scan for storage changes:

iscsiadm -m node -R

Now, running the previous command again will have a slightly different output. We can not identify the modified LUN

cat /proc/partitions

We should increase it in size. XenServer uses LVM, so we should harness it to our needs. Let's assume that the modified disk is /dev/sdd.

pvresize /dev/sdd

After completing this task on all pool hosts, we should run sr-scan command. Either by CLI, or through the GUI. When the scan operation completes, the new size would show.

Hope it helps!