Archive for the ‘Not Really Technical’ Category

XenServer 6.2 is now Open Source!

Tuesday, June 25th, 2013

It is an amazing news to me. I really love XenServer. I think that Citrix were able to make a good use of Linux mechanisms for the purposes of virtualization, without abusing the OS layer (like some of the other virtualization solutions did). The file locations are decent (for example – most parts are located in /opt, which is the right place for it to be at), and in general, it always felt to me as if Citrix developers (and the original XenSource developers) had respect for the OS. I liked it, and still do.

The product was not perfect. There were ups and downs, there were times when I cursed it, and times when I was full of joy by its behavior – which can happen from time to time, if you really like and care about a software product.

So, today Citrix announced that XenServer 6.2, the shiny new release, will become fully open-sourced. That the entire feature-set of XenServer previous versions can be yours for free. However, for support and some minor administrative tasks, you will want to purchase the licensed version. As far as I understood, these are the differences. Almost nothing more. Wow. Kudos!

Grab it while it’s hot here!

Recycling old and terrible

Tuesday, October 23rd, 2012

I find it that identifying a missing something in the fridge, and adding it to a list does not work well for me. It’s either that I take a mental note of the missing groceries, and then, almost immediately, forget them until the unpacking of the just-purchased groceries, back home, several days later, or that I actually move myself into writing it down on a note, placed on the fridge, and then, of course, forget to take the note with me to the supermarket. Not working.

I have had an old tablet I purchased as my first Android device (and I’m not quite sure why I stayed liking Android in general after the experience I have had with the device). This tablet was very weak when purchased (didn’t get better since), and very cheap (that’s why I purchased it). It’s called ‘Eken M001’ and you can read a review of it here.

This tablet was horrible when purchased. You can hardly do anything with it. However, I came up with an idea – why not use it to hold a grocery purchase list on the fridge and sync this list to my Android cell phone? Wow! A silly, and very cool idea, at the same time.

So, today I have (re)installed the device, configured it to support Hebrew (not that simple on Android 1.6, a breeze on Android 4 and above. Guess what version I have there…) and added that nice list application “OurGroceries”. The result is in the following pictures:

The fridge is hardly visible, acting as our white background. To prevent the device from falling, I have attached it to the sides of the fridge, and not to the door.

I hope it actually will save my problem there. Could be nice 🙂

Getting rid of some junk…

Monday, November 21st, 2011

It wasn’t junk once…

This stuff used to be useful, but it has been laying around for a long while now, doing nothing but collect some dust. I have ‘donated’ some stuff to someone who actually wanted it, but neither him nor me can find a use, nowadays, to a monochrome display card with an ISA 8bit connector, or about 20 56k ISA and PCI modems, or all kind of other old, and once useful junk. So I have let go, and the picture you see is of most of the stuff I have taken to the electronics recycle facility nearby. That was a hack of a work.

Remaining: Some desktops (maybe I will throw away some more, donno yet), Sun Ultra 80 (Since you can never get a SPARC platform when you need it), an IBM FastT200 (one day I will do something with it. Donate it to a better cause than to the junk yard), and, well, that’s all actually.

BTW – not in the picture – two IBM servers and two Dell servers, and many hard drives, which were given to the helpful man who assisted me with carrying this all to the recycle center.

 

 

 

 

 

 

RedHat Cluster custom Oracle “Agent”/script V1.0

Friday, April 24th, 2009

Working with RH Cluster quite a lot, I have decided to create an online store of customer agents/scripts.

I have not, so far, invested the effort of making these agents accept settings from the cluster.conf file, but this might happen.

Let the library be!

Oracle DB script/agent:

Although I discovered (a bit late) that RH Cluster for Oracle Ent. Linux 5.2 does include oracle DB agent, this script should be good enough for RHEL4 RH Cluster versions as well.

This script only checks that the ‘smon’ process is up. Nothing fancy. This script can include, in the future, the ability to check that Oracle responses to SQL queries (meaning – actually working).

#!/bin/bash
#Service script for Oracle DB under RH Cluster
#Written by Ez-Aton
#http://run.tournament.org.il

# Global variables
ORACLE_USER=oracle
HOMEDIR=/home/$ORACLE_USER
OVERRIDE_FILE=/var/tmp/oracle_override
REC_LIST="user@domain.com"

function override () {
	if [ -f $OVERRIDE_FILE ]
	then
		exit 0
	fi
}

function start () {
	su - $ORACLE_USER -c ". $HOMEDIR/.bash_profile ; sqlplus / as sysdba << EOF
startup
EOF
"
	status
}

function stop () {
	su - $ORACLE_USER -c ". $HOMEDIR/.bash_profile ; sqlplus / as sysdba << EOF
shutdown immediate
EOF
"
	status && return 1 || return 0
}

function status () {
	ps -afu $ORACLE_USER | grep -v grep | grep smon
	return $?
}

function notify () {
	mail -s "$1 oracle on `hostname`" $REC_LIST < /dev/null
}

override
case "$1" in
start)	start
	notify $1
	;;
stop)	stop
#	notify $1
	;;
status)	status
	;;
*)	echo "Usage: $0 start|stop|status"
	;;
esac

I usually place this script (with execution permissions, of course) in /usr/local/sbin and call it as a “script” from the cluster configuration. You will probably be required to alter the first few variable lines to match to your environment.

Listener Agent/script:

The tnslsnr should be started/stopped as well, if we want the $ORACLE_HOME to migrate as well. This is its agent/script:

#!/bin/bash
#Service script for Oracle DB under RH Cluster
#Written by Ez-Aton
#http://run.tournament.org.il

ORACLE_USER=oracle
HOMEDIR=/home/$ORACLE_USER
OVERRIDE_FILE=/var/tmp/oracle_override

function override () {
if [ -f $OVERRIDE_FILE ]
then
exit 0
fi
}

function start () {
su - $ORACLE_USER -c ". $HOMEDIR/.bash_profile ; lsnrctl start"
status
}

function stop () {
su - $ORACLE_USER -c ". $HOMEDIR/.bash_profile ; lsnrctl stop"
status && return 1 || return 0
}

function status () {
su - $ORACLE_USER -c ". $HOMEDIR/.bash_profile ; lsnrctl status"
}

override
case "$1" in
start)    start
;;
stop)    stop
;;
status)    status
;;
*)    echo "Usage: $0 start|stop|status"
;;
esac

Again – place it in /usr/local/sbin and call it from the cluster configuration file as type “script”.

I will add more agents and more resources for RedHat Cluster in the future.

Blog Migration

Monday, January 12th, 2009

I have been quiet during the last few days as I was playing with WordPress Mu as a solution for containing several WordPress sites, with one management interface. This is an amazing product, and following my implementation, about 18 blogs are already there.
My site required some special handling. As you know, my URL was http://www.tournament.org.il/run up until now, however, looking up – you will see the address http://run.tournament.org.il in the address bar. This required some special handling, and I hope it will do no evil to my page ranks. The previous change did horrible things to it…
So – using Apache redirection methods, as can be found in this link, was the easiest solution to maintain the whole URL with only a minor shift.