Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Using yum with SOCKS proxy

Sunday, June 30th, 2019

SSH is a wonderful tool. One of its best features is the ability to pierce a firewall and let you go through it. If you’re using the dynamic port (-D as argument in command line openSSH), you actually get a SOCKS5 proxy over which you can transport all your desired data.

This allows you the freedom of accessing the Internet from a restricted machine, on the condition it can connect via SSH to another unrestricted machine. So – how does it work?

To simplify things – you will need two sessions on your restricted machine. Use the first to connect via SSH to an unrestricted machine, with the argument, in our example, -D 10000

What it tells the SSH connection is to create a SOCKS5 proxy locally (on the restricted machine) over port 10000, and all the transport sent there – to transfer through the remote (unrestricted) server.

Using the other session, we can implement local variable like this:

export http_proxy=socks5://localhost:10000

export https_proxy=socks5://localhost:10000

It sets a variable which yum (among many other programs) can read and use. Afterwards, using the same session, running ‘yum update‘ or ‘yum install package‘ will result in yum running through the proxy connection. Of course – the SSH session to the unrestricted server must be active at all times, or else yum command will fail.

Oracle important patches

Friday, February 9th, 2018

I use this blog as an external memory. I found myself lately looking for the obvious patches for Oracle GI and RDBMS products, and although I eventually reach the right location, the time consumed looking for them is a wasted time. So – to make sure I can remember them correctly, here are the two important sites:

Oracle OPatch: https://updates.oracle.com/download/6880880.html

Oracle GI/DB patches: https://support.oracle.com/epmos/faces/DocumentDisplay?id=2118136.2

Things to remember…

Monday, October 24th, 2011

As my work takes me to various places (where technology is concerned), I collect lots of browser tab of things I want to keep for later reference.
I have to admit, sadly, that I lack the time to sort them out, to make a real good and nice post about them. I do not want to lose them, however, so I am posting now those which I find or found in the past as more useful to me. I might expand either of them one day into a full post, or elaborate further on them. Either or none. For now – let’s clean up some tab space:
Reading IPMI sensors. Into Cacti, and into Nagios, with some minor modifications by myself (to be disclosed later, I believe):
Cacti
Nagios
This is somewhat info of the plugin check_ipmi_sensor
And its wiki (in German. Use Google for translation)
XenServer checks:
check_xen_pool
Checking XenServer using NRPE
But I did not care about Dom0 performance parameters, as they meant very little regarding the hypervisor’s behavior. So I have combined into it the following XenServer License Check. Unfortunately, I could run it only on the XenServer domain0, due to python version limitations on my Cacti /Nagios server.
You can obtain XenServer SDK
This plugin looks interesting for various XenServer checks, but I have never tried it myself.
Backing up (exporting) XenServer VMs as a scheduled task. I have had it modified extensively to match my requirements, but I am allowed to, it has some of its sources based on my blog 🙂
Installing Dell OpenManage on XenServer 5.6.1, and the nice thing is that it works fine on XenServer 6 as well.
Oracle ASM recovery tips . One day I will take it further, and investigate possible human errors and methods of fixing them. Experience, they say, has a value 🙂
A guide dealing with changing from raw to block devices in Oracle ASM . This is only a small part of it, but it’s the thing that interests me.
Understanding Steal Time in Linux Xen-based VMs.
Because I always forget, and I’m too lazy to search again and again (and reach the same page again and again): Upgrading PHP to 5.2 on Centos 5
And last – a very nice remote-control software fomr my Android phone. Don’t leave home without it. Seriously.

Reduced to only 23 tabs is excellent. This was a very nice job, and these links will be useful. To me, for sure. I hope that to you as well.

Preparing your own autoyast with custom Suse CD

Friday, August 17th, 2007

Suse, for some reason, has to be over-complicated. I don’t really know why, but the time required to perform simple tasks under Suse is longer than on any other Linux distro, and can be compared only to other legacy Unix systems I am familiar with.

When it comes to a more complicated tasks, it gets evern worse.

I have created an autoinst.xml today. It, generally speaking, installs a SLES10.1 system from scratch. Luckily, I was able to test it in a networked environment, so I helped the environment just a bit by not throwing tons of CDs.

Attached is my autoinst.xml. Notice that the root user has the password 123456, and that this file is based on a rather default selection.

Interesting, though, is my usage of the <ask> directives, which allow me to ask for manual IP address, Netmask, gateway, etc during the 2nd phase of the installation. sles10.1-autoinst.xml

This is only a small part. Assuming you want to ship this autoinst.xml with your Suse CDs, as a stand-alone distribution, you need to do the following:

1. Mount as loop the first CD:

mount -o loop /home/ezaton/ISO/SLES10-SP1-CD1.iso /mnt/temp

2. For quick response, if you have the required RAM, you could try to create a ramdisk. It will sure work fast:

mkdir /mnt/ram

mount -t ramfs -o size=700M none /mnt/ram

3. Copy the data from the CD to the ramdisk:

cp -R /mnt/temp/* /mnt/ram/

4. Add your autoinst.xml to the new cd root:

cp autoinst.xml /mnt/ram/

5. Edit the required isolinux.cfg parameters. On Suse10 it resides in the new <CD-ROOT>/boot/i386/loader/isolinux.cfg. In our case, CD-ROOT is /mnt/ram

Add the following text to the "linux" append line:

autoyast=default install=cdrom

6. Generate a new ISO:

cd /mnt/ram

mkisofs -o /tmp/new-SLES10.1-CD1.iso -b boot/i386/loader/isolinux.bin -r -T -J -pad -no-emul-boot -boot-load-size 4 -c boot.cat -boot-info-table /mnt/ram

7. When done, burn your new CD, and boot from it.

8. If everything is ok, umount /mnt/ram and /mnt/temp, and you’re done.

Note – It is very important to use Rock Ridge and Jouliet extensions with the new CD, or else files will be in 8.3 format, and will not allow installation of SLES.

Broadcom (tg3) and quirks in Linux

Saturday, June 2nd, 2007

Most modern servers use Broadcom network cards. The module is called tg3 and is known to have issues.

You can find in my blog several posts about weird problems with tg3. This post is about another one I’ve encountered only recently.

The server: Dell PowerEdge (PE) 830. Linux version: RedHat Advanced Server 4 (RHEL4) Update 4. Kernel version 2.6.9-42.ELsmp. Version of the tg3 module: 3.52-rh.

Problem: When the card is being activated (brought up), it looses link for about 5 seconds. Later the link reappears and everything is fine. Implication: You cannot run DHCP client (dhclient) with this card, as it looses the link, and the DHCP client will fail with "link not ready" error message.

Fixed IP address works well, although the cards still looses the link when its being activated.