Posts Tagged ‘lun’

Hot-resize disks on Linux

Monday, April 6th, 2020

After major investigations around, I came to the conclusion that a full guide describing the procedure required for online disk resize on Linux (especially – expanding disks). I have created a guide for RHEL5/6/7/8 (works the same for Centos or OEL or ScientificLinux – RHEL-based Linux systems) which takes into account the following four scenarios:

  • Expanding a disk where there is a filesystem directly on disk (no partitioning used)
  • Expanding a disk where there is LVM PV directly on disk (no partitioning used)
  • Expanding a disk where there is a filesystem on partition (a single partition taking all the disk’s space)
  • Expanding a disk where there is an LVM PV on partition (a single partition taking all the disk’s space)

All four scenarios were tested with and without use of multipath (device-mapper-multipath). Also – notes about using GPT compared to MBR are given. The purpose is to provide a full guideline for hot-extending disks.

This document does not describe the process of extending disks on the storage/virtualisation/NAS/whatever end. Updating the storage client configuration to refresh the disk topology might differ in various versions of Linux and storage communication methods – iSCSI, FC, FCoE, AoE, local virtualised disk (VMware/KVM/Xen/XenServer/HyperV) and so on. Each connectivity/OS combination might require different refresh method called on the client. In this lab, I use iSCSI and iSCSI software initiator.

The Lab

A storage server running Linux (Centos 7) with targetcli tools exporting 5GB (or more) LUN through iSCSI to Linux clients running Centos5, Centos6, Centos7 and Centos8, with the latest updates (5.11, 6.10, 7.7, 8.1). See some interesting insights on iSCSI target disk expansion using linux LIU (targetcli command line) in my previous post.

The iSCSI clients all see the disk as ‘/dev/sda’ block device. When using LVM, the volume group name is tempvg and the logical volume name is templv. When using multipath, the mpath name is mpatha. On some systems the mpath partition would appear as mpatha1 and on others as mpathap1.

iSCSI client disk/partitions were performed like this:

Centos5:

* Filesystem on disk

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mkfs.ext3 /dev/sda
mount /dev/sda /mnt

* LVM on disk

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2
3
4
5
pvcreate /dev/sda
vgcreate tempvg /dev/sda
lvcreate -l 100%FREE -n templv tempvg
mkfs.ext3 /dev/tempvg/templv
mount /dev/tempvg/templv /mnt

* Filesystem on partition

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3
parted -s /dev/sda "mklabel msdos mkpart primary 1 -1"
mkfs.ext3 /dev/sda1
mount /dev/sda1 /mnt

* LVM on partition

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3
4
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parted -s /dev/sda "mklabel msdos mkpart primary 1 -1 set 1 lvm on"
pvcreate /dev/sda1
vgcreate tempvg /dev/sda1
lvcreate -l 100%FREE -n templv tempvg
mkfs.ext3 /dev/tempvg/templv
mount /dev/tempvg/templv /mnt

Centos6:

* Filesystem on disk

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mkfs.ext4 /dev/sda
mount /dev/sda /mnt

* LVM on disk

1
2
3
4
5
pvcreate /dev/sda
vgcreate tempvg /dev/sda
lvcreate -l 100%FREE -n templv tempvg
mkfs.ext4 /dev/tempvg/templv
mount /dev/tempvg/templv /mnt

* Filesystem on partition

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3
parted -s /dev/sda "mklabel msdos mkpart primary 1 -1"
mkfs.ext4 /dev/sda1
mount /dev/sda1 /mnt

* LVM on partition

1
2
3
4
5
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parted -s /dev/sda "mklabel msdos mkpart primary 1 -1 set 1 lvm on"
pvcreate /dev/sda1
vgcreate tempvg /dev/sda1
lvcreate -l 100%FREE -n templv tempvg
mkfs.ext4 /dev/tempvg/templv
mount /dev/tempvg/templv /mnt

Centos7/8:

* Filesystem on disk

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2
mkfs.xfs /dev/sda
mount /dev/sda /mnt

* LVM on disk

1
2
3
4
5
pvcreate /dev/sda
vgcreate tempvg /dev/sda
lvcreate -l 100%FREE -n templv tempvg
mkfs.xfs /dev/tempvg/templv
mount /dev/tempvg/templv /mnt

* Filesystem on partition

1
2
3
parted -a optimal -s /dev/sda "mklabel msdos mkpart primary 1 -1"
mkfs.xfs /dev/sda1
mount /dev/sda1 /mnt

* LVM on partition

1
2
3
4
5
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parted -a optimal -s /dev/sda "mklabel msdos mkpart primary 1 -1 set 1 lvm on"
pvcreate /dev/sda1
vgcreate tempvg /dev/sda1
lvcreate -l 100%FREE -n templv tempvg
mkfs.xfs /dev/tempvg/templv
mount /dev/tempvg/templv /mnt

Some variations might exist. For example, use of ‘GPT’ partition layout would result in a parted command like this:

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parted -s /dev/sda "mklabel gpt mkpart ' ' 1 -1"

Also, for multipath devices, replace the block device /dev/sda with /dev/mapper/mpatha, like this:

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parted -a optimal -s /dev/mapper/mpatha "mklabel msdos mkpart primary 1 -1"

There are several common tasks, such as expanding filesystems – for XFS, using xfs_growfs <mount target> ; for ext3fs and ext4fs using resize2fs <device path>. Same goes for LVM expansion – using pvresize <device path>, followed by lvextend command, followed by the filesystem expanding command as noted above.

The document layout

The document will describe the client commands for each OS, sorted by action. The process would be as following:

  • Expand the visualised storage layout (storage has already expanded LUN. Now we need the OS to update to the change)
  • (if in use) Expand the multipath device
  • (if partitioned) Expand the partition
  • Expand the LVM PV
  • Expand the filesystem

Actions

For each OS/scenario/mutipath combination, we will format and mount the relevant block device, and attempt an online expansion.

Operations following disk expansion

Expanding the visualised storage layout

For iSCSI, it works quite the same for all OS versions. For other transport types, actions might differ.

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iscsiadm -m node -R

Expanding multipath device

If using multipath device (device-mapper-multipath), an update to the multipath device layout is required. Run the following command (for all OSes)

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multipathd -k"resize map mpatha"

Expanding the partition (if disk partitions are in use)

This is a bit complicated part. It differs greatly both in the capability and the commands in use between different versions of operation systems.

Centos 5/6

Online expansion of partition is impossible, except if used with device-mapper-multipath, in which case we force the multipath device to refresh its paths to recreate the device. It will result in an I/O error if there is only a single path defined. For non-multipath setup, a umount and re-mount is required. Disk partition layout cannot be read while the disk is in use.

Without Multipath
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fdisk /dev/sda # Delete and recreate the partition from the same starting point
partprobe # Run when disk is not mounted, or else it will not refresh partition size
With Multipath
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fdisk /dev/mapper/mpatha # Delete and recreate the partition from the same starting point
partprobe
multipathd -k"reconfigure" # Sufficient for Centos 6
multipathd -k"remove path sda" # Required for Centos 5
multipathd -k"add path sda" # Required for Centos 5
# Repeat for all sub-paths of expanded device
Centos 7/8
Without Multipath
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fdisk /dev/sda # Delete and recreate partition from the same starting point. Sufficient for Centos 8
partx -u /dev/sda # Required for Centos 7
with Multipath
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fdisk /dev/mapper/mpatha # Delete and recreate the partition from the same starting point. Sufficient for Centos 8
kpartx -u /dev/mapper/mpatha # Can use partx

Expanding LVM PV and LV

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pvresize DEVICE
Device can be /dev/sda ; /dev/sda1 ; /dev/mapper/mpatha ; /dev/mapper/mpathap1 ; /dev/mapper/mpatha1 – according to the disk layout and LVM choice. lvextend -l +100%FREE /dev/tempvg/templv

Expanding filesystem

For ext3fs and ext4fs
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resize2fs DEVICe
Device can be /dev/sda ; /dev/sda1 ; /dev/mapper/mpatha ; /dev/mapper/mpathap1 ; /dev/mapper/mpatha1 – according to the disk layout and LVM choice.
For xfs
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xfs_growfs /mnt

Additional Considerations

MBR vs GPT

On most Linux versions (For Centos – up and including version 7) the command ‘fdisk’ is incapable of handling GPT partition layout. If using GPT partition layout, use of gdisk is recommended, if it exists for the OS. If not, parted is a decent although somewhat limited alternative.

gdisk command can also modify a partition layout (at your own risk, of course) from MBR to GPT and vice versa. This is very useful in saving large data migrations where legacy MBR partition layout was used on disks which are to be expanded beyond the 2TB limits.

GPT backup table is located at the end of the disk, so when extending a GPT disk, it is require to repair the GPT backup table. Based on my lab tests – it is impossible to both extend the partition and repair the GPT backup table location in a single call to gdisk. Two runs are required – one to fix the GPT backup table, and then – after the changes were saved – another to extend the partition.

Storage transport

I have demonstrated use of iSCSI software initiator on Linux. Different storage transport exist – each may require its own method of ‘notifying’ the OS of changed storage layout. See RedHat’s article about disk resizing (RHN access required). This article explains how to refresh the storage transport for a combination of various transports and RHEL versions. and sub-versions.

Connecting EMC/NetApp shelves as JBOD to a Linux machine

Wednesday, April 29th, 2015

Let’s say you have old shelves of either EMC or NetApp with SAS or SATA disks in them. And let’s say you want to connect them via FC to a Linux machine and have some nice ZFS machine/cluster, or whatever else. There are few things to know, and to attend in order for it to work.

The first one is the sector size. For NetApp – this applies only to non SATA disks (I don’t know about SSDs, though), and for EMC this could apply, as far as I noticed, to all disks – sector size is not 512 bytes, but 520 – the additional 8 bytes are used for block checksum. Linux does not handle well 520 blocks – the following error message will appear in the logs:

Unsupported sector size 520.

To solve it, we will need to identify the disks – using sg3_utils (in Centos-like – yum install sg3_utils) and then modify them to block size of 512 bytes. To identify the disks, run:

sg_scan -i
/dev/sg0: scsi0 channel=3 id=0 lun=0
HP P410i 3.66 [rmb=0 cmdq=1 pqual=0 pdev=0xc]
/dev/sg1: scsi0 channel=0 id=0 lun=0
HP LOGICAL VOLUME 3.66 [rmb=0 cmdq=1 pqual=0 pdev=0x0]
/dev/sg2: scsi3 channel=0 id=0 lun=0 [em]
hp DVD A DS8A5LH 1HE3 [rmb=1 cmdq=0 pqual=0 pdev=0x5]
/dev/sg3: scsi1 channel=0 id=0 lun=0
SEAGATE SX3500071FC DA04 [rmb=0 cmdq=1 pqual=0 pdev=0x0]
/dev/sg4: scsi1 channel=0 id=1 lun=0
SEAGATE SX3500071FC DA04 [rmb=0 cmdq=1 pqual=0 pdev=0x0]
/dev/sg5: scsi1 channel=0 id=2 lun=0
SEAGATE SX3500071FC DA04 [rmb=0 cmdq=1 pqual=0 pdev=0x0]
/dev/sg6: scsi1 channel=0 id=3 lun=0
SEAGATE SX3500071FC DA04 [rmb=0 cmdq=1 pqual=0 pdev=0x0]
/dev/sg7: scsi1 channel=0 id=4 lun=0
SEAGATE SX3500071FC DA04 [rmb=0 cmdq=1 pqual=0 pdev=0x0]
/dev/sg8: scsi1 channel=0 id=5 lun=0
SEAGATE SX3500071FC DA04 [rmb=0 cmdq=1 pqual=0 pdev=0x0]
/dev/sg9: scsi1 channel=0 id=6 lun=0
SEAGATE SX3500071FC DA04 [rmb=0 cmdq=1 pqual=0 pdev=0x0]
/dev/sg10: scsi1 channel=0 id=7 lun=0
SEAGATE SX3500071FC DA04 [rmb=0 cmdq=1 pqual=0 pdev=0x0]
/dev/sg11: scsi1 channel=0 id=8 lun=0
FUJITSU MXW3300FE 0906 [rmb=0 cmdq=1 pqual=0 pdev=0x0]
/dev/sg12: scsi1 channel=0 id=9 lun=0
FUJITSU MXW3300FE 0906 [rmb=0 cmdq=1 pqual=0 pdev=0x0]
/dev/sg13: scsi1 channel=0 id=10 lun=0
SEAGATE SX3300007FC D41B [rmb=0 cmdq=1 pqual=0 pdev=0x0]
/dev/sg14: scsi1 channel=0 id=11 lun=0
SEAGATE SX3300007FC D41B [rmb=0 cmdq=1 pqual=0 pdev=0x0]
/dev/sg15: scsi1 channel=0 id=12 lun=0
SEAGATE SX3300007FC D41B [rmb=0 cmdq=1 pqual=0 pdev=0x0]
/dev/sg16: scsi1 channel=0 id=13 lun=0
SEAGATE SX3300007FC D41B [rmb=0 cmdq=1 pqual=0 pdev=0x0]
/dev/sg17: scsi1 channel=0 id=14 lun=0
SEAGATE SX3300007FC D41B [rmb=0 cmdq=1 pqual=0 pdev=0x0]

So, for each sg device (member of our batch of disks) we need to modify the sector size.

Two ways to do so – the first suggested by this post here, is by using sg_format in the following manner:

sg_format –format –size=512 /dev/sg2

Another post suggested using a dedicated program called ‘setblocksize’. I followed this one, and it worked fine. I had to power cycle the disks before the Linux could use them.

I did notice that disk performance were not bright. I got about 45MB/s write, and about 65-70 MB/s read for large sequential operations, using something like:

dd bs=1M if=/dev/sdf of=/dev/null bs=1M count=10000
dd bs=1M if=/dev/null of=/dev/sdf oflag=direct count=10000 # WARNING – this writes on the disk. Do not use for disks with data!

Fairly disappointing. Also, using multipath, when the shelf is connected to one FC port, and then back to another, showed me that with the setting:

path_grouping_policy multibus

I got about 10MB/s less compared to using “failover” flag (the default for Centos 6). Whatever modification I did to the multipathd.conf, I was unable to exceed this number when using multiple access. These results were consistent when using multibus or group_by_serial, however, when a single path was active and the other was passive, It clearly showed better. I did modify rr_min_io and rr_min_io_rq, but with no effect.

The low disk performance could suggest I need to flush the original disk firmware, however, I am not sure I will do so. If anyone is reading this and had different results – I would love to hear about it.

XenServer 6.5 PCI-Passthrough

Thursday, April 16th, 2015

While searching the web for how to perform PCI-Passthrough on XenServers, we mostly get info about previous versions. Since I have just completed setting up PCI-Passthrough on XenServer version 6. 5 (with recent update 8, just to give you some notion of the exact time frame), I am sharing it here.

Hardware: Cisco UCS blades, with fNIC. I wish to pass through two FC HBAs into a VM (it is going to act as a backup server, and I need it accessing the FC tape). While all my XenServers in this pool have four (4) FC HBAs, this particular XenServer node has six (6). I am intending the first four for SR communication and the remaining two for the PCI Passthrough process.

This is the output of ‘lspci | grep Fibre’:

0b:00.0 Fibre Channel: Cisco Systems Inc VIC FCoE HBA (rev a2)
0c:00.0 Fibre Channel: Cisco Systems Inc VIC FCoE HBA (rev a2)
0d:00.0 Fibre Channel: Cisco Systems Inc VIC FCoE HBA (rev a2)
0e:00.0 Fibre Channel: Cisco Systems Inc VIC FCoE HBA (rev a2)
0f:00.0 Fibre Channel: Cisco Systems Inc VIC FCoE HBA (rev a2)
10:00.0 Fibre Channel: Cisco Systems Inc VIC FCoE HBA (rev a2)

So, I want to pass through 0f:00.0 and 10:00.0. I had to add to /boot/extlinux.conf the following two entries after the word ‘splash’ and before the three dashes:

pciback.hide=(0f:00.0)(10:00.0) xen-pciback.hide=(0f:00.0)(10:00.0)

Initially, and contrary to the documentation, the parameter pciback.hide had no effect. As soon as the VM started, the command ‘multipath -l‘ would hang forever (or until hard reset to the host).

To apply the settings above, run (for a good measure. Don’t think we need it, but did not read anything about it): ‘extlinux -i /boot‘ and then reboot.

Now, when the host is back, we need to add the devices to the VM. Make sure that the VM is in ‘off’ state before doing that. Your command would look like this:

xe vm-param-set uuid=<VM UUID> other-config:pci=0/0000:0f:00.0,0/0000:10:00.0

The expression ‘0/0000’ is required. You can search for its purpose, however, in most cases, your value would look exactly like mine – ‘0/0000’

Since my VM is Windows, here it almost ends: Start the VM, and if it boots correctly, Install Cisco VIC into it, as if it were a physical host. You’re done.

XenServer – increase LVM over iSCSI LUN size – online

Wednesday, September 4th, 2013

The following procedure was tested by me, and was found to be working. The version of the XenServer I am using in this particular case is 6.1, however, I belive that this method is generic enough so that it could work for every version of XS, assuming you're using iSCSI and LVM (aka - not NetApp, CSLG, NFS and the likes). It might act as a general guideline for fiber channel communication, but this was not tested by me, and thus - I have no idea how it will work. It should work with some modifications when using Multipath, however, regarding multipath, you can find in this particular blog some notes on increasing multipath disks. Check the comments too - they might offer some better and simplified way of doing it.

So - let's begin.

First - increase the size of the LUN through the storage. For NetApp, it involves something like:

lun resize /vol/XenServer/luns/SR1.lun +1t

You should always make sure your storage volume, aggregate, raid group, pool or whatever is capable of holding the data, or - if using thin provisioning - that a well tested monitoring system is available to alert you when running low on storage disk space.

Now, we should identify the LUN. From now on - every action should be performed on all XS pool nodes, one after the other.

cat /proc/partitions

We should keep the output of this command somewhere. We will use it later on to identify the expanded LUN.

Now - let's scan for storage changes:

iscsiadm -m node -R

Now, running the previous command again will have a slightly different output. We can not identify the modified LUN

cat /proc/partitions

We should increase it in size. XenServer uses LVM, so we should harness it to our needs. Let's assume that the modified disk is /dev/sdd.

pvresize /dev/sdd

After completing this task on all pool hosts, we should run sr-scan command. Either by CLI, or through the GUI. When the scan operation completes, the new size would show.

Hope it helps!

Hot resize Multipath Disk – Linux

Friday, August 19th, 2011

This post is for the users of the great dm-multipath system in Linux, who encounter a major availability problem when attempting a resize of mpath devices (and their partitions), and find themselves scheduling a reboot.

This documented is based on a document created by IBM called "Hot Resize Multipath Storage Volume on Linux with SVC", and its contents are good for any other storage. However - it does not cover the procedure required in case of a partition on the mpath device (for example - mpath1p1 device).

I will demonstrate with only two paths, but, with understanding this process, it can be well used for any amount of paths for a device.

I do not explain how to reduce a LUN size, but the apt viewer will be able to generate a method out of this document. I, for myself, try to avoid as much as I can from shrinking LUNs. I prefer backup, LUN recreation, and then restore. In many case - it's just faster.

So - back to our topic - first - increase the size of your LUN on the storage.

Now, you need to collect the paths used for your mpath device. Check this example:

mpath1 (360a980005033644b424a6276516c4251) dm-2 NETAPP,LUN
[size=200G][features=1 queue_if_no_path][hwhandler=0][rw]
_ round-robin 0 [prio=4][active]
_ 2:0:0:0 sdc 8:32  [active][ready]
_ round-robin 0 [prio=1][enabled]
_ 1:0:0:0 sdb 8:16  [active][ready]

The devices marked in bold are the ones we will need to change. Lets get their current size:

blockdev --getsz /dev/sdb
419430400

Keep this number somewhere safe. We can (and should!) assume that sdc has the same values, otherwise, this is not the same exact path.

Collect this info for the partition as well. It will be smaller by a tiny bit:

blockdev --getsz /dev/sdb1
419424892

Keep this number as well.

Now we need to reread the current (storage-based) size parameters of the devices. We will run

blockdev --rereadpt /dev/sdb
blockdev --rereadpt /dev/sdc

Now, our size will be slightly different:

blockdev --getsz /dev/sdb
734003200

Of course, the partition size will not change. We will deal with it later. Keep the updated values as well. Of course, the multipath still holds the disks with their original size values, so running 'multipath -ll' will not reveal any size change. Not yet.

We now need to create editable dmsetup map. Use the current command to create two files: cur and org containing this map:

dmsetup table mpath1 | tee org cur
0 419424892 multipath 1 queue_if_no_path 0 2 1 round-robin 0 1 1 8:32 128 round-robin 0 1 1 8:16 128

Important part - explaining some of these values. The map shows the device's size in blocks - 419424892. It shows some parameters, it shows path groups info (0 2 1), and both sub devices - sdc being 8:32 and sdb being 8:16. Try it with 'ls -la /dev/sdb' to see the minor and major. At this point, if you are not familiar with majors and minors, I would recommend you do some reading about it. Not mandatory, but will make your life here safer.

We need to delete one of the paths, so we can refresh it. I have decided to remove sdb first:

multipathd -k"del path sdb"

Now, running the multipath command, we will get:

mpath1 (360a980005033644b424a6276516c4251) dm-2 NETAPP,LUN
[size=200G][features=1 queue_if_no_path][hwhandler=0][rw]
_ round-robin 0 [prio=4][active]
_ 2:0:0:0 sdc 8:32  [active][ready]

Only one path. Good. We will need to edit the 'cur' file created earlier to reflect the new settings we are to introduce:

0 419424892 multipath 1 queue_if_no_path 0 1 1 round-robin 0 1 1 8:32 128

The only group left was the one containing 'sdc' (8:32), and since one group down, the bold number was changed from 2 to 1 (as there is only a single path group now!)

We need to reload multipath with these settings:

dmsetup suspend mpath1; dmsetup reload mpath1 cur; dmsetup resume mpath1

The correct response for this line is 'ok'. We pause mpath1, reload and then resume it. It is best to be in a single line, as this process freezes IO for a short period of time on the device, and we prefer it to be as short as possible.

Now, as /dev/sdb is not a part of the multipath managed devices, we can modify it. I usually use 'fdisk' - deleting the old partition, and recreating it in the new size, but you must make sure, if your device requires LUN alignment, that you recreated the partition from the same start point. I will dedicate a post some time to LUN alignment, but not at this particular time. Just a hint - if you're not sure, run fdisk in expert mode and get a printout of your partition table (fdisk /dev/sdb and then x and then p). If your partition starts at 128 or 64, it is aligned. If not (usually for large LUNs - at 63), you are not, and you should either be worried about it, but not now, or should not care at all.

Back to our task.

We need to grab the size of the newly created partition, for later use. Write it down somewhere.

blockdev --getsz /dev/sdb1
733993657

Following the partition recreation, we need to introduce the device to the multipath daemon. We do this by:

multipathd -k"add path sdb"

followed by immediately removing the remaining device:

multipathd -k"del path sdc"

We need to have our 'cur' file updated, so we can release the device to our uses. This time, we update both the size section with the new size, and the new, remaining path. Now, the file looks like this:

0 734003200 multipath 1 queue_if_no_path 0 1 1 round-robin 0 1 1 8:16 128

As mentioned before - the large number in bold is the new size of the block device. The amount of failure groups is one (1), also in bold, and the device name is 'sdb' which is 8:16. Save this modified file, and run:

dmsetup suspend mpath1; dmsetup reload mpath1 cur; dmsetup resume mpath1

Running the command 'multipath -ll' you will get the real size of the device.

mpath1 (360a980005033644b424a6276516c4251) dm-2 NETAPP,LUN
[size=350G][features=1 queue_if_no_path][hwhandler=0][rw]
_ round-robin 0 [prio=1][active]
_ 1:0:0:0 sdb 8:16  [active][ready]

We will need to reread the partition layout of /dev/sdc. The quickest way is by running:

partprobe

This should do it. We can now add it back in:

multipathd -k"add path sdc"

and then run

multipath

(which should result in all the available paths, and the correct size).

Our last task is to update the partition size. The partition, normally, is called mpath1p1, so we need to read its parameters. Lets keep it in a file:

dmsetup table mpath1p1 | tee partorg partcur

We should now edit the newly created file 'partcur' with the new size. You should not change anything else. Originally, it looked like this:

0 419424892 linear 253:2 128

and it was modified to look like this:

0 733993657 linear 253:2 128

Notice that the size (in bold) is the one obtained from /dev/sdb1 (!!!) and not /dev/sdb.

We need to reload the device. Again - attempt to do it in a single line, or else you will freeze IO for a long time (which might cause things to crush):

dmsetup suspend mpath1p1; dmsetup reload mpath1p1 partcur; dmsetup resume mpath1p1

Do not mistaked mpath1 with mpath1p1.

Our device is updated, our paths are online. We are happy. All left to do is to online resize the file system. With ext3, this is done like this:

resize2fs /dev/mapper/mpath1p1

The mount will increase in size online, and all left for us is to wait for it to complete, and then go home.

I hope this helps. It helped me.